Book Reviews

Small business can be big business with the right tools. Explore your options with these books, covering everything from the law to direct mail.

The Big Book of Small Business
By Tom Gegax with Phil Bolsta
Hardcover, 448 pages, $29.95
Collins Business
212-207-7000
www.harpercollins.com

There are countless books that explain how to start and run a business. What separates this one from the pack is its disarming honesty. In “The Big Book of Small Business: You Don’t Have to Run Your Business by the Seat of Your Pants”, Tom Gegax explains how he started Tires Plus and then almost ran it into the ground before turning it into a $200 million business. In tightly written chapters, Gegax details his experiences and then lays out exactly what you need and why you need it, covering everything from funding a business to helping your employees grow and succeed. It’s impossible to discount such hard-won lessons.

The Employer’s Legal Advisor
By Thomas M. Hanna
Hardcover, 224 pages, $24
Amacom
800-714-6395
www.amacombooks.org

One thing a small business can’t afford is a lawsuit. Thomas M. Hanna knows this all too well, which is why he penned “The Employer’s Legal Advisor”. Knowing that many disputes occur between the employee and the employer, he clearly outlines everything from being a good witness in court to preventing claims from surfacing by setting rules and timelines for employees. Instead of reiterating federal laws, Hanna gives real-life advice that could save you time and money, and ensure better relationships with your employees.

Photographing Arts, Crafts & Collectibles
By Steve Meltzer
Paperback, 160 pages, $24.95
Lark/Sterling
212-532-7160
www.sterlingpublishing.com

Taking product shots with a digital camera can be daunting. Steve Meltzer explains every detail of digital cameras and how to use them in “Photographing Arts, Crafts & Collectibles: Take Great Digital Photos for Portfolios, Documentation or Selling on the Web”. The overview of digital photography covers every part of the camera and how it works, without the technical jargon. The following chapters examine lighting and photographing two- and three-dimensional products, then wrap up with troubleshooting and resources.

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